Spanish Style Landscaping Ideas

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If you are a home gardener who’s looking for a fresh, new method to landscape your garden or the yard of your house, you might want to consider using a Spanish design. This requires the use of specific Mediterranean plants, particularly lovely flowering climbing vines, along with a definitive geometric pattern within the style of any structures. You are able to achieve this look with some meticulous planning and attention.
The use of a trellis, arbor or pergola is a superb way to add a Spanish feel for your home’s outdoor landscape. It features a distinctly Mediterranean flavor and can make an even bigger impression whenever you grow climbing roses or any other flowering vines over it. A Spanish-style landscape, or courtyard, is going to be remembered by real estate agents and buyers alike, setting your house apart.Architectural Elements

Courtyards, mission bells, arches and wrought iron have the ability to their place in a Spanish-style landscape. For instance, use a wrought iron gate under an arch in the entrance to your front yard to welcome guests. Produce a courtyard by surrounding a patio with waist high stucco walls. Give a fireplace to extend the use of the patio in to the evenings. Hang wrought iron chandeliers in the overhead beams of the ramada.

Tile

Saltillo pavers immediately invoke the design of a Spanish courtyard. Use decorative ceramic colored tile as accents on fireplaces, the Saltillo floor so that as a border surrounding doors and windows. Tie together a patio by including decorative tiles around the support posts of the patio roof. Split up broken tiles even further and make up a mosaic table top.

Colors

Bold colors belong inside a Spanish landscape. Try a mixture of turquoise, orange and red or yellow, cobalt blue and green. Flowers don’t bloom in turquoise, so use that color in fabrics and pottery. Spray several pots in turquoise for any cohesive look. Lantana (Lantana trifoliata), bougainvillea (Bougainvillea glabra) and hibiscus (Hibiscus acetosella) thrive in warm climates. Bougainvillea is included with colorful bracts — leaves that surround the small white flowers, several times annually. Colors include bright orange, red, purple, peach and white. The guarana plant throws out long branches that have to be tied to a support. They’ll cover a wall inside a summer’s time. Lantana comes in yellow, white and purple in addition to combinations of pink, red, purple, and orange, often on a single plant. Trailing lantana spreads to eight feet, vertical lantana grows to 4 feet high and wide. Hibiscus has large flowers with bright yellow stamens. The flowers are flared contributing to 4 inches in diameter. All look wonderful in a Mediterranean-inspired landscape. Don’t visit flowers for color within the landscape include citrus trees using the flash of yellow from ripening lemons along with a burst of orange from tangerines. Consider dwarf species in pots to interrupt up the hardscape of the patio. Bring houseplants for example bromeliads (Crypthanthus) and crotons (Croton) outside to brighten up shady areas.

Water fountain

Water splashing down a fountain right into a pond cools you recorded on a hot summer day simply by looking at it. The sound of water masks street or neighbor noises too. A tiered fountain is classic Spanish landscape, if your yard or your budget does not have room, substitute a smaller fountain or perhaps water tumbling out of a pot. Surround the fountain with brightly-colored geraniums in reds, oranges and hot pink. When the area doesn’t get enough sun for geraniums use ferns or hostas instead.

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